The historic Palace Green Library steps up security measures with 2020 Vision – Durham University library building

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Feb 11
2010

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North Shields-based 2020 Vision has been commissioned to ramp up security measures at the Palace Green Library – Durham University library building..  The library was at the centre of attention this summer when 53-year-old Raymond Scott was jailed for handling a ‘priceless’ Shakespeare Folio, which went missing in a raid on the library in 1998.

2020 Vision has installed 15 further cameras into the centuries old building and has added a smart tracking system to a number of the Library’s most valuable publications.

Managing director at 2020 Vision, Peter Houlis said: “There is no doubt that Palace Green Library is one of the most stunning buildings we have ever been asked to provide a solution on. It is steeped in history and those at Durham University want to take all the steps to ensure its recent history is not repeated in future.

“We are thrilled to have had this opportunity to work closely with the University on providing some specialist and bespoke solutions to the very particular security requirements they have.”

2020 Vision has added 15 cameras onto a new digital recording system, which offers crystal clear images throughout the library. In addition, the award-winning organisation has also implemented the special ISIS Aspects TMArts System. This has enabled the Library to individually tag, monitor, track and audit the exact movement of a wide number of its most treasured publications and possessions held within the building.

Dr Sheila Hingley, Head of Heritage Collections at Durham University Library said “The increased security measures at Palace Green Library, coupled with our investment to restore and redevelop our historic space, will ensure we can offer unprecedented public access to some of our wonderful treasures – from our now well-known Shakespeare First Folio to a collection of medieval manuscripts of significant national importance.”

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